DOUG THORPEDOUG THORPE http://dougthorpe.com Leadership Powered by Common Sense Wed, 24 May 2017 17:12:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://i2.wp.com/dougthorpe.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/cropped-h-logo.jpg?fit=32%2C32 DOUG THORPE http://dougthorpe.com 32 32 114195028 Helping Rising Stars Shine http://dougthorpe.com/helping-rising-stars-shine/ http://dougthorpe.com/helping-rising-stars-shine/#respond Wed, 24 May 2017 14:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3787 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

What can we do about a manager who won’t lead? I was asked this question during a large conference recently. (I love doing the live Q&As at these things). First, let me set the stage as to why the question was framed this way. We had been talking about “making rising stars shine”, those who […]

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Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

What can we do about a manager who won’t lead? I was asked this question during a large conference recently. (I love doing the live Q&As at these things).

First, let me set the stage as to why the question was framed this way. We had been talking about “making rising stars shine”, those who might become part of a succession or executive continuity plan; the development of high potential candidates inside a company. Included with the presentation were some ideas about the key distinctions between management and leadership. In summary, I had said:

Management is about process. Leadership is about people.

—DOUG THORPE

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I had stated that companies must decide between creating and sponsoring a management development program or a leadership development one. Do you want to build managers or leaders? It’s a key strategic choice and one that is valid depending on the job grades, corporate cultures, and industry specifics.

Back to the Question

What to do about a manager who won’t lead? This implies that the company has an expectation of its managers to be leaders. Personally, I prefer that mindset. Here are your options.

Dive In –  Begin making proactive inquiries as to what the manager is doing exactly. Track behaviors and outcomes. I was told this person has been quoted as saying “I just want to do the work”. It sounds like they were a bad choice for Manager. While they might have the skill set to make the process happen and get deliverables out, the statement would suggest a big disconnect with any notion of leadership, desire or insight.

Perhaps this person was thrust into the role due to a battlefield promotion. The job came open and they were the brightest bulb on the string. I mean no disrespect as this is the common practice in many places. However, making this kind of promotion often serves to simply snuff out the high producer. When asked to oversee other employees, the circumstances unwind. The top producer is now just a tyrant of a boss.

Make Assessments – Get specific about what the expectations are and find ways to develop the skills and behaviors of leadership you want your unit leads to use. This is a personal task. Each candidate must be evaluated for specific strengths and weaknesses.

Stakeholders need to get involved, sharing their views of the situation. A continuous feedback loop including those stakeholders must be developed and used.

Coaching –  The person needs coaching about the role and the expectations. Whether the coaching is done internally or with external resources, a coach can come alongside the person to work through the process for building awareness, designing a growth plan, running the stakeholder feedback, and getting results.

Last but Not Least –  You may need to make a change. This person may simply not be suited for the role, especially when the corporate expectation is to provide leadership, not just management. The initial selection to place the candidate in the role might just be a bust. That happens.

The offset to consider is the impact on the rest of the team. Will perpetuating this person’s role while hopefully getting some development coaching be good enough to avoid burning out the rest of the team? Of should you act more swiftly to vacate the position and select a candidate who aspires to lead more than manage?

Helping Rising Stars Shine

It’s not easy to design and operate an internal program to groom leadership talent. Whether you have to pluck unit leads from the ranks or supply a pipeline of talent that gets exposed to solid leadership development (most smaller companies cannot afford such luxury), grooming your next wave of managers and leaders is no small task.

If you would like to hear more about ways to design a high potential development program, use the link below.

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Can executives really change their behavior? http://dougthorpe.com/coaching-execs/ http://dougthorpe.com/coaching-execs/#respond Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3819 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

Dear Tribe, Interesting articles are something people love to get and I love to give.   Here is one I think you will enjoy. This note came from a coaching colleague of mine. It asks a key question about behavioral change and gives an intuitive way to explain the leadership growth process to executives. Enjoy! […]

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Dear Tribe,
Interesting articles are something people love to get and I love to give.  

Here is one I think you will enjoy. This note came from a coaching colleague of mine. It asks a key question about behavioral change and gives an intuitive way to explain the leadership growth process to executives.

Enjoy!

Doug


Coaching for Behavioral Change

People often ask, “Can executives really change their behavior?” The answer is definitely yes. If the coach will follow these basic steps, clients almost always get better!

My mission is to help successful leaders achieve positive, long-term, measurable change in behavior.

The following process is highly transferable and is being used by certified coaches around the world to deliver Measurable Leadership Growth, Guaranteed. When these steps are followed, leaders can always achieve positive, measurable results in changed behavior – not as judged by themselves, but as judged by pre-selected, key co-workers. This process has been used with great success by both external coaches and internal coaches and you can do it to.

Leadership legacy

  1. Involve the leaders being coached in determining the desired behavior in their leadership roles. Leaders cannot be expected to change behavior if they don’t have a clear understanding of what desired behavior looks like. The people that I coach (in agreement with their managers) work with me to determine desired leadership behavior.

  2. Involve the leaders being coached in determining key stakeholders. Not only do clients need to be clear on desired behaviors, they need to be clear (again in agreement with their managers) on key stakeholders. There are two major reasons why people deny the validity of feedback, either wrong items being rated, or wrong raters. Having clients and their managers agree on the desired behaviors and key stakeholders in advance helps ensure their “buy in” to the process.

  3. Collect feedback. In my coaching practice, I personally interview all key stakeholders. The people who I am coaching are all CEOs or potential CEOs, and the company is making a real investment in their development. However, at lower levels in the organization (that are more price sensitive), traditional 360° feedback can work very well. In either case, feedback is critical. It is impossible to get evaluated on changed behavior if there is not agreement on what behavior to change!

  4. Reach agreement on key behaviors for change. As I have become more experienced, my approach has become simpler and more focused. I generally recommend picking only one to two key areas for behavioral change with each client. This helps ensure maximum attention to the most important behavior. My clients and their managers (unless my client is the CEO) agree upon the desired behavior for change. This ensures that I won’t spend a year working with my clients and have their managers determine that we have worked on the wrong thing!

  5. Have the coaching clients respond to key stakeholders. The person being reviewed should talk with each key stakeholder and collect additional “feed forward” suggestions on how to improve the key areas targeted for improvement. In responding, the person being coached should keep the conversation positive, simple, and focused. When mistakes have been made in the past, it is generally a good idea to apologize and ask for help in changing the future. I suggest that my clients listen to stakeholder suggestions and not judge the suggestions.

  6. Review what has been learned with clients and help them develop an action plan. As was stated earlier, my clients have to agree to the basic steps in our process. On the other hand, outside of the basic steps, all of the other ideas that I share with my clients are suggestions. I just ask them to listen to my ideas in the same way they are listening to the ideas from their key stakeholders. I then ask them to come back with a plan of what they want to do. These plans need to come from them, not me. After reviewing their plans, I almost always encourage them to live up to their own commitments. I am much more of a facilitator than a judge. I usually just help my clients do what they know is the right thing to do.

  7. Develop an ongoing follow-up process. Ongoing follow-up should be very efficient and focused. Questions like, “Based upon my behavior last month, what ideas do you have for me for next month?” can keep a focus on the future. Within six months conduct a two- to six-item mini-survey with key stakeholders. They should be asked whether the person has become more or less effective in the areas targeted for improvement.

  8. Review results and start again. If the person being coached has taken the process seriously, stakeholders almost invariably report improvement. Build on that success by repeating the process for the next 12 to 18 months. This type of follow-up will assure continued progress on initial goals and uncover additional areas for improvement. Stakeholders will appreciate the follow-up. No one minds filling out a focused, two- to six-item questionnaire if they see positive results. The person being coached will benefit from ongoing, targeted steps to improve performance.

This approach has high impact for both top executives and can be even more useful for high-potential future leaders. These are the people who have great careers in front of them. Increasing effectiveness in leading people can have an even greater impact if it is a 20-year process, instead of a one-year program.

In Conclusion

People often ask, “Can executives really change their behavior?” The answer is definitely yes. At the top of major organizations even a small positive change in behavior can have a big impact at all levels of management. From an organizational perspective, the fact that the executive is trying to change anything (and is being a role model for personal development) may be even more important than what the executive is trying to change. One key message that I have given every CEO that I coach is this…

To help others develop – start with yourself!

—DOUG THORPE

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Thank you for your time. If you would like to discuss ways I might help you with your own executive development, click below.

Schedule a Call

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Do you suffer from Bright Shiny Objects? http://dougthorpe.com/leaders-focus/ http://dougthorpe.com/leaders-focus/#respond Mon, 22 May 2017 09:00:38 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3778 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

Bright shiny objects distract us right? Too many leaders suffer from an occasional bout of BSO Syndrome, chasing bright shiny objects. A leader’s focus must remain clear. What are some bright shiny objects?  I am not talking about material things, although those certainly can distract. I once knew a CEO who had a large 10 […]

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Bright shiny objects distract us right? Too many leaders suffer from an occasional bout of BSO Syndrome, chasing bright shiny objects. A leader’s focus must remain clear.

What are some bright shiny objects?  I am not talking about material things, although those certainly can distract. I once knew a CEO who had a large 10 foot mural of a road racing bicycle he owned hung in his office. Seriously, a 10 foot picture of a bike, with pedals and chains. Kudos to him for his dedication to cycling, but seriously. How distracting was that mural?

The notion of bright shiny objects means the shifting of focus from the central track we need to be operating on to less than significant efforts that rob energy and effort from the venture. In one word, distraction.

When we fall prey to chasing BSO, we lose sight of the plan we are on, priorities slip, even relationships change. We can get blinded to the lure of the BSO.

There’s a funny thing though. People subject to frequent BSO syndrome usually don’t even know they do it. Why? They are too busy bouncing from one object to the next.

When you are tasked with leading a team, you have to be ever-vigilant for BSO distraction. They come in many ways. Here are the key ones:

YOU GET LOST

You as the leader find and see some BSO, so you get lost. Your attention shifts away from the primary direction. You take a detour. You become the one with glazed vision and a fixed stare, looking at the new thing, unable to refocus on the key elements of your work.

I have attorney friends who often complain about clients who miss the critical aspects of a legal fight because they are more focused on the BSO elements instead of the bigger picture. Big cases have been lost over BSO chasing mentality.

THE TEAM GETS LOST

A whole team can get caught up in some form of bright shiny object, causing a herd mentality. When the masses shift on you, their leader, you have to rein it back in again. By over-communicating core values, vision, and direction, you reduce or eliminate the risk of the team shifting away from you to chase a BSO.

Being proactive rather than reactive can eliminate the herd mentality.

—DOUG THORPE

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Fortunately, team shift caused by bright shiny objects is rare. In most cases, a team shift is not about bright and shiny things, but doom and gloomy things. Bad momentum can cause a whole team to shift. But that’s another topic.

THE MARKET GETS LOST

This may be the toughest form of BSO Syndrome to fight. When a whole market shifts to the next big thing, you have to be ready to make informed decisions about whether you want to take your business in a different direction. There is a fine line between waiting out a temporary shift (a true, but temporary, flight to some BSO) versus a real change in a market.

Kodak infamously missed the digital photography shift. Digital wasn’t just some BSO, it was a disruptive progression of change.

Being too dedicated to avoiding all bright shiny objects may leave you behind or totally out of a market. Occasionally what appears to be a BSO may need to be carefully evaluated after all. This is especially true with shifts in the market value of your product or service.

The Best Solution

The best way to avoid distraction from chasing BSO is to maintain an awareness of your priorities and purpose. Allow for frequent checks on the primary objectives you have set in your plan. Be true to to those efforts first. Be open and honest with yourself and others about chasing bright shiny objects. As a leader you must have a feedback loop provided by trusted advisors who can call you out on a venture down BSO Lane.

Question: Leave a comment and share your latest story about bright shiny objects. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Also, I have some limited times during the day that I am willing to take calls to answer questions from the tribe here. To schedule your call, just click below.

Schedule a Call

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Leaders: Get Out of Your Own Box http://dougthorpe.com/stuck-in-your-own-box/ http://dougthorpe.com/stuck-in-your-own-box/#respond Wed, 17 May 2017 14:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3766 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

Nowadays ‘thinking outside the box’ is cliché. We’ve heard it so much we have either forgotten what the idea was really about or written it off. The problem is that psychologists tell us we all have these personal paradigms that drive our reaction and interaction with culture and society. The older we get, the more […]

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Nowadays ‘thinking outside the box’ is cliché. We’ve heard it so much we have either forgotten what the idea was really about or written it off.

The problem is that psychologists tell us we all have these personal paradigms that drive our reaction and interaction with culture and society. The older we get, the more “Set in our ways” we become. This is the perfect example of operating from within a very narrow box.

In front of a large audience one day, I asked two volunteers to step on stage. I had arranged two large shipping boxes, something as large as the crates that refrigerators come in. The two volunteers were to step inside each box (doors had been cut to ease the access). Then I asked them to proceed with talking to one another as though they had just met, introducing themselves to one another and talking like this was a networking event.

They couldn’t do it very well. They were talking over each other, interrupting, missing words and phrases from the other person. Clearly their communication was suffering. With little to no connection, their meeting was turning out to be a disaster.

They were then told to exit the box; step outside and face each other. Now resume the effort. Well, of course, things improved quickly.

This was a graphic display of the problems with operating from inside our personal paradigms. Whatever bias, value structure, prejudice, or judgment you have against the world, staying inside your box will prohibit you from adequately connecting with others.

By staying inside those boxes we filter everything being heard and received. Often that filtering corrupts the message or the intent of the sender.

As you meet a new person, strive to understand their “box” first. Forget your bad ideas and limited scope. Hear them genuinely and seek first to understand (a la Steven Covey). You just cannot build a high trust relationship without it. This fits for hiring managers, sales leads, new friends, and other personal relationships.

Give yourself a test. Try this for just one full week. Make a concerted effort to unfilter everything you receive from those around you. Don’t jump to any assumptions or conclusions. If you’ve already ‘tagged’ a person, give them the grace to erase that tag. See and hear them for what they might really be saying.

See the amazing things that can happen. Post back here and let me know what you find.

If you would like to explore more ideas for growing your own leadership influence, click the link below to schedule a short, but free call.

Schedule a Call

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Stuck Right Now? Here’s How to Get 3 Levels Beyond http://dougthorpe.com/stuck-right-now-heres-get-3-levels-beyond/ http://dougthorpe.com/stuck-right-now-heres-get-3-levels-beyond/#respond Mon, 15 May 2017 09:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3754 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

Are you feeling stuck. It’s like walking in quicksand. You can’t make any forward progress. We’ve all been there before. This feeling is a common event in most people’s lives. As the chapters of life unfold, there are moments when everything seems to just get stuck and you start to lose the vision of the […]

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Are you feeling stuck. It’s like walking in quicksand. You can’t make any forward progress.

We’ve all been there before. This feeling is a common event in most people’s lives. As the chapters of life unfold, there are moments when everything seems to just get stuck and you start to lose the vision of the way ahead. Some may think of this as drifting through life.

The plan is missing, lost, or forgotten. You just want to make it through another day. You, my friend, need to know there is more waiting for you. Here are three steps to get past feeling stuck.

The Shift

The Shift

First, you need to make a shift. There needs to be a disruptive force or series of events that can shake things up. Mostly this is a shift that needs to happen in your mind; the way you are thinking.

I see so many people every day who are stuck in their mindset. Their head is filled with negative, limiting thoughts. “I can’t do that”, “I am too weak”, “I don’t have that skill”, “I don’t know that subject”.

You may also need to shift the people who are around you, especially if they serve to enforce those negative thoughts. If you speak a limiting thought and they agree with you, they are not being any help. Find some new friends.

Start growing away from old, bad thoughts. Read new books, watch some TED talk videos, open your mind to new ideas. Get a refresh!

By engaging a shift mindset, you can begin to pull out of the muck where you are stuck.

The Lift

The Lift

As the shift builds momentum, you will get a feeling of lift. Just like the wind passing over the wings of a bird or an airplane, there is lift. The whole body rises into flight.

Pressure and stress will ease. Old burdens will fall away and you will feel a growing energy.

Lift creates a move to new direction. You sense a freedom of thought, action, and purpose. You are renewed.

The Gift

The Gift

As you rise above the old state of mind, you achieve a newness; a renewed sense of purpose. You get a fresh look at the world ahead. Empowered by the new energy you will be a gift to those around you.

As a manager and leader, your fresh view of things can become contagious. Your smile and energy will impact others. You can help them begin their own shift out of ‘stuckness’.

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Leadership: How do you handle feedback? http://dougthorpe.com/leadership-how-do-you-handle-feedback/ http://dougthorpe.com/leadership-how-do-you-handle-feedback/#respond Wed, 10 May 2017 14:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3733 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

The further you get into management and leadership, the farther away you might get from personal feedback. Yes, the boss will certainly let you know what you are doing wrong, but what if you ARE the boss? Is there anyone or any way you receive feedback? Receiving feedback is not always easy. Seldom is the […]

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The further you get into management and leadership, the farther away you might get from personal feedback. Yes, the boss will certainly let you know what you are doing wrong, but what if you ARE the boss? Is there anyone or any way you receive feedback?

Feedback

Feedback

Receiving feedback is not always easy. Seldom is the feedback positive as in “hey great job” or “wow, you really crushed that moment”. If you are getting this positive feedback on a regular basis, you are in rare air. Enjoy it.

Leaders cannot work in a vacuum. They may take on larger, seemingly more important roles in an organization, but this does not exclude them from asking for and using feedback. In fact, a leader arguably needs feedback more so than anyone else. It’s what helps a leader respond appropriately to events in pursuit of successful outcomes.

—JACK CANFIELD

No, sadly, feedback is usually more negative. There is never a need for more negative feedback. You can find it often. For every great decision you make, someone somewhere will be doubting or objecting. That comes with the territory of being a manager.

How do you handle feedback?

There are three ways that people receive and react to feedback.

Categorical Denial

There are those who profess a tough skin and merely choose to ignore feedback. They take the position that no one knows my job better than me. Anyone who disagrees can take a hike. Doubt me and I will show you.

If the feedback is anonymous,as it sometimes may be, the person operating in denial merely brushes it off without any response.

That’s the kind of manager you want to avoid. Denial is not just a river in Egypt. It’s a sad position to be in as a leader. There is always an opportunity to grow and learn. If you reject feedback, you have shut the door on learning. Of course mistakes will get made.

Regardless of how flawlessly you think your decisions can be, there is room for error. Error creates a natural feedback loop. Whether your team was impacted directly or indirectly by your error, you need feedback to make the right corrections. For every action there is a reaction.

I’m So Mad

The next response may be to just get angry. The mindset sounds something like this “I am so mad they tried to call me out” or “I am going to be sure they pay for such an insubordinate move”.

Anger and hostility toward feedback is a narrow and uninformed response. As mentioned above, there is always room t grow as a leader. If you choose to reject such growth, you will stay stuck at one level for a very long time.

There is one other downside to getting angry about it. People will stop communicating. If you explode every time someone points something out, well-meaning subordinates will give up. They will cease to participate in growing the team.

Emotional Intelligence

A leader with a higher degree of emotional intelligence will welcome feedback and administer it properly. Sure you need to analyze the details. Some may be bunk, but the majority is usually valuable. Consider the source as credible or simply disgruntled. There are always different possibilities.

Once the source and the substance of the feedback is understood, then an emotionally intelligent leader will take it in. They will distil the teaching moment. The recommendation or suggestion will be seen through an objective lens of consideration for improvement.

If there is learning to be done, then this leader will do so; applying the feedback as a positive, looking for the gain from the experience.

How do you respond to feedback?

What is your natural mode? For anyone who wants to be a better leader, thee is only one response. You take feedback in, process it, distil it, and learn from it.

We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.

—BILL GATES

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Question: Share your most recent experience dealing with feedback. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

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Leaders: Are You a Happy Pig? http://dougthorpe.com/are-you-a-happy-pig-2/ http://dougthorpe.com/are-you-a-happy-pig-2/#respond Mon, 08 May 2017 09:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3654 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

No, not trying to be mean. I once shared with an audience the story about the “Pig of Happiness” by . This is a short story written and illustrated as a gift card, but the story line is profound. It is about a pig who decides to stop being like all other pigs. He chooses […]

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No, not trying to be mean. I once shared with an audience the story about the “Pig of Happiness” by Edward Monkton. This is a short story written and illustrated as a gift card, but the story line is profound.

It is about a pig who decides to stop being like all other pigs. He chooses to become happy. When all the others around him are fussing about the weather, their conditions, and life in general, he decides to be “happy” instead. He goes about spreading this light among all the barnyard animals. Pretty soon a funny thing happens. The whole barnyard gets happy. Things make a huge turnaround.

As simple as this story is, it reflects a serious lesson for all of us. Regardless of circumstance, there is a choice you can make daily. Do you choose to be happy or not? Circumstance and bank account should never impact true, real happiness. We CAN be happy regardless of the situation. Are you a happy pig?

So much of my coaching involves resetting mindsets. These are attitudes and opinions that can take root in a person’s soul. You can guess that most are negative. There is a tendency to focus on the bad things that have happened rather than the good that does occur.

I stay amazed at how hard it is for people to embrace the goodness and blessings in their life; the little victories that happen all the time. Rather they choose to highlight the bad things.

What About Problems?

The problem is not the problem. It is about the way we choose to look at the problem. Stuff happens, right? It happens to all of us. Things don’t go as we hoped, yet we store the experience of the moment in one of two ways.

Either we learn from the situation, taking away valuable lessons. This is a choice for growth and a big reason to be happy. You learned something!

Or we log it as a “Yep, you see. Bad things always happen to me.” What a sad choice this one is.

Snowball Effect

Momentum is a powerful force. Think of the large flywheel on a machine. It takes a lot to get it turning, but once it is in motion, it takes even more to stop it. The same is true in business and in life.

When your momentum begins moving in the right direction, you become an unstoppable force in your own sphere of influence. People can’t get enough of you.

Unfortunately, the same holds true of negative momentum. Keep thinking bad thoughts and the clouds get darker and darker.

Brain science experts tell us that our brain will hard wire itself based on the various synapse that fire together. A synapse is the gap between two nerves. Repetitive thought patterns make the synapse connect in a hardwired sort of way. Once they hard wire, it is very difficult to change our mindset because the hard wire path is the default setting of that part of the brain.

Attraction

Oh and by the way, once you make your own decision for happiness, did you know it attracts others? Try it out for a while and see what you find.

Happy pigs make big changes in the world. Smiling is contagious. Genuine happiness can be a beautiful addition to an otherwise dismal world.

What do you want to choose today. Are you a happy pig?

If you would like to talk about your thoughts on this important mental attitude, join me on a free introductory call.

Join me for a free call

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Leadership: Are You Inbound or Outbound? http://dougthorpe.com/inbound-or-outbound/ http://dougthorpe.com/inbound-or-outbound/#respond Wed, 03 May 2017 14:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3703 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

In the fast paced world of Internet marketing, there are two distinctly different approaches. There is inbound and outbound. Management and leadership has these same two dimensions. Outbound marketing is the traditional approach we all know where companies try to push their message, putting up posters, banners, signage, sending phone messages/dialers, and very forward efforts […]

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In the fast paced world of Internet marketing, there are two distinctly different approaches. There is inbound and outbound. Management and leadership has these same two dimensions.

Outbound marketing is the traditional approach we all know where companies try to push their message, putting up posters, banners, signage, sending phone messages/dialers, and very forward efforts to get your attention. The end game is the hope you buy something.

Inbound marketing, on the other hand, is the more subtle and gentler approach. The provider offers valuable information about a good, service, or topic. This information is something the prospective buyer can consume for free. There may be a voluntary exchange of contact information to receive the information (think ebook or survey result). The buyer’s willingness to give up that contact info is more than offset by the value of the content they receive.

As I was dealing with my own marketing service providers, I was struck by the idea that management and leadership has this same inbound/outbound conundrum.

When you assume a leadership role, you have to choose. Will my approach be inbound or outbound? Here are a few indicators of each style.

Outbound Management Style

  • Giving directives
  • My way or the highway mindset
  • Closed door environment where employees are not welcome
  • The workplace has a feel of autocratic rule with no regard for what the employees think
  • “I’m the boss, they better pay attention”

Managing Up the Organization

Inbound Leadership Style

  • Nurturing trust relationships with the team
  • Employee environment of permission and protection – freedom to do the work and knowledge that the boss has my back
  • Open communication
  • Servant heart for leadership
  • Freely given recognition for a job well done

Clearly it is safe to say the outbound style is a tradition of management, Theory X approach, taught and followed for decades. Just like outbound marketing, outbound leadership is the approach used by far too many. The tide is shifting. Outbound leadership isn’t really leadership at all. It embodies the core of management, but not leadership. Outbound will get things done for some period of time, but at what cost?

Employee engagement will not be very good under outbound domination at the hand of the boss. Instead, the inbound style is far more likely to draw workers in, inspiring them to perform rather than beating them down to get something done.

The workplace has a long way to go to embrace the inbound leadership style. As I write this, I can almost hear the eyeballs rolling in people’s heads.

New, emerging business leaders must entertain the move to inbound leadership. The growing number of younger workers demand it. Inbound is the way they now live. Forcing them to live one way, then shift to the old outbound management style at work will not do much for your talent retention.

Question: What are the ways you operate as an inbound leader? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

To dig deeper on your own leadership style, call me for a free consultation.

Make the Call

 

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HR Houston – Gulf Coast Symposium [Event] http://dougthorpe.com/events/hr-houston-gulf-coast-symposium/ http://dougthorpe.com/events/hr-houston-gulf-coast-symposium/#respond Tue, 02 May 2017 09:00:42 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?post_type=event&p=3562 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

Event Post

“Helping Your Rising Stars Shine”

I’ll be presenting this session to attendees of the 2017 Gulf Coast Symposium HR Issues

Join this session to gain a clear and measurable process for helping new, first-time managers make successful transitions from doer to leader. Any business executive who struggles with appointing new managers can use this information to define a program for helping these new superstars shine. Most companies may have a high potential program, but they fail to address common challenges faced by all new managers.

 

Date: May 11, 2017—May 12, 2017
Time: 2:45 p.m.
Event: HR Houston – Gulf Coast Symposium
Topic: “Making Your Rising Stars Shine”
Sponsor: HR Houston
Venue: NRG Convention Center
Public: Public
Registration: Click here to register.
More Info: Click here for more information.

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Are you really a “people person”? http://dougthorpe.com/are-you-really-a-people-person-2/ http://dougthorpe.com/are-you-really-a-people-person-2/#respond Mon, 01 May 2017 09:00:00 +0000 Doug Thorpe http://dougthorpe.com/?p=3657 Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

When was the last time you heard someone say “I am a people person”? Candidates for various management jobs often describe themselves as a people person. What is that exactly? I have a friend who is an HR professional. He tells me the response they use is “Oh good. If you are a people person, […]

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Here is the latest article from Doug Thorpe

When was the last time you heard someone say “I am a people person”? Candidates for various management jobs often describe themselves as a people person. What is that exactly?

I have a friend who is an HR professional. He tells me the response they use is “Oh good. If you are a people person, we can pay you five people a week. Will that be OK?”

But seriously folks. Most of us know where that concept came from. Originally when someone said they were a “people person” it meant they could deal with others in a positive way. It also likely meant they liked doing it. It was supposed to indicate a sincerity for interaction, the ability to relate, a consensus builder. Do you think people really do that anymore?

I fear the truth is we have lost some of the drive, desire, and ability to truly relate with people. Of course some of us are really good at it. But I don’t see where we teach that anymore. Instead, it seems young people are being encouraged to get better with computers and automated interfaces, but they do not get the same encouragement when faced with facing a live specimen.

When have you heard about training for one on one communication? What about simple social graces like waiting outside a conference room right before the meeting starts. Instead of making small talk, faces are buried on smart phones or tablets. Leaders can build more rapport with their team in those short moments outside the meeting than they do inside the meeting once the official discussion has started.

Social media is not really that social at all.

One indication: A recent Pew Research survey of adults in the U.S. found that 71% use Facebook at least occasionally, and 45% of Facebook users check the site several times a day.

That sounds like people are becoming more sociable. But some people think the opposite is happening. The problem, they say, is that we spend so much time maintaining superficial connections online that we aren’t dedicating enough time or effort to cultivating deeper real-life relationships. Too much chatter, too little real conversation.

Others counter that online social networks supplement face-to-face sociability, they don’t replace it. These people argue that we can expand our social horizons online, deepening our connections to the world around us, and at the same time take advantage of technology to make our closest relationships even closer.

Larry Rosen, a professor of psychology at California State University, Dominguez Hills, says technology is distracting us from our real-world relationships. Keith N. Hampton, who holds the Professorship in Communication and Public Policy at Rutgers University’s School of Communication and Information, argues that technology is enriching those relationships and the rest of our social lives.

Let’s rally together and do something different. If you struggle with making new friends, try baby steps first. Try simply saying hello to someone at the grocery store. Wave to a neighbor you haven’t spoken to in a while.

A second issue is the difference between connecting and communicating. While we may have hundreds of Facebook friends—people we never would have met otherwise, with whom we can share many new things—do they really provide the kind of human interaction that is so essential to our emotional health?

Psychologists define social capital, or the benefit we derive from social interactions, in two ways: bonding and the more superficial bridging. Research shows that virtual-world friends provide mostly bridging social capital, while real-world friends provide bonding social capital.

Larry Rosen states

“For instance, in one study we found that while empathy can be dispensed in the virtual world, it is only one-sixth as effective in making the recipient feel socially supported compared with empathy proffered in the real world. A hug feels six times more supportive than an emoji.”

To be a true people person, the number of friends or connections on social media has nothing to do with the people you can influence with your day-to-day behavior. Can you add value? Can you emote empathy and support for someone in need of encouragement during a tough time? Are you genuine?

The next time a friend or co-worker expresses something personal, decide whether you are truly a people person. Or will you simply brush it aside so you can get back to posting on Twitter or Facebook.

Let’s try to be a real “people person”.

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