Managers, How Do You Show Up?

As you go about your day to day activity, how do you show up?

Whether you are the boss or just one of the team, you have choices every minute of every day. The way you decide to show up in the moment can be the single greatest factor in measuring your effectiveness and success.

Domino Effect

It’s interesting to realize that one bad start early in the day can shape the rest of the day. But I’ll save that idea for another message.

Today we’re going to talk about three key opportunities where showing up matters most.

Showing Up One-on-One

No experience at work or at home matters more than the minute when you are one-on-one with someone. You’re alone together.

Get updates via email

There are no distractions, no one else is competing for time and attention.

What are you going to do? How will you show up? Or more importantly, how can you change the way you usually show up.

Building strong, meaningful relationships happens best in the privacy of the one-on-one.

Showing up requires your attention. You must not let other things distract you from the discussion you are about to have. Ringing telephones or random interruptions leave the other person with the impression they are not important.

Your listening matters here too. Your ability to express the right amount of empathy allows a more freely flowing exchange. Proving to the other person that you are attentive and engaged is best done with feedback based on what the other person said.

one on one meeting

Being transparent matters here too. By being open, honest, and even vulnerable to the person with whom you are having the one-on-one allows the trust to build. The more you can do to achieve high levels of trust, the better your outcome will be.

Managers Engaging the Team

Management duties often involve team oriented situations. Having routine staff/team meetings creates the perfect opportunity to show up big or fail miserably. Which do you choose?

Showing up is not about dominating the room. Instead, it involves much the same as one-on-one with one big addition.

showing up at the team meeting

Keep an eye on the whole team. Watch body language and subtle hints about your team’s engagement.

Doing this requires showing up fully ready to engage yourself. Be prepared.

Also, think about intentional messages you need to deliver or consensus you hope to build. Know in advance what you hope to get from the team meeting. Respect other’s time. Use it wisely.

Be decisive if asked for decisions. If you’re really not ready to make a decision on the spot, again, be transparent. Say so.

Managers Showing Up in the Organization

Showing up also impacts your success with those above you or to whom your report. Even CEOs have boards or investors for accountability.

managing up the organization

When you must report up, show up. Likely you were selected or elected for the role, so someone had a belief you can do the job. Remember that.

Use it to strengthen your approach and confidence.

Here Are 10 Ways You can Show Up

  1. Be prepared – try not to let any interpersonal opportunities go by without some degree of preparation
  2. Be in the moment – as new encounters unfold, put aside all other distractions
  3. Listen empathetically – assure the others) you are hearing what they are saying
  4. Listen more than speak – two ears, one tongue is sage advice
  5. Be transparent – whenever possible be completely open and transparent and yes there are plenty of opportunities to be this way).
  6. Don’t judge – be fair in your dealings
  7. Model the right behaviors – know what your situation calls for in the way you present yourself
  8. Be genuine – be yourself. Trying to be something or someone else doesn’t work
  9. Be confident – work on this if you have to, but be secure in what you are talking about
  10. State the things you heard – recap the moment to achieve the best clarity for the communication

If you can do these things with each and every opportunity to show up, your reputation and effectiveness as a leader will grow.

Leave a comment or share any other experiences you have had “showing up” as a manager or a leader.